Kay’s Story: I’m Genderfluid

I’m Genderfluid. What does that mean? Well it means that sometimes I feel like a different gender than the one I was born assigned to (male), and sometimes I feel…

Love Yourself In the Writing Ebbs

My eyes pry themselves open at 8 am, then shut again. Just 9 more minutes. Just hit the snooze. That snooze becomes 10 and soon enough I’m dragging myself out…

Nothing can Prepare You for the World

My mother is borderline. Just writing this sentence down makes me shake a little. I know it, I’ve talked to other people about it, but...what if she reads it? What if somehow she finds this anonymous piece and connects it? What kind of a horrible daughter am I for even putting this out into the ether? My mother is borderline, and I still never know what to do with it. How to navigate. It was something I didn’t even figure out or have the language to put to it until I turned 20. I suppose in writing this, my hope is that maybe just one person can find the language they need to begin healing. Or to feel some sort of validation. Because...it’s one of the most empirically confusing experiences. If anyone is reading this who’s borderline themselves, by the way, please don’t think of it as a condemnation. My mother is very unaware of her effect on others, and not particularly able to work on herself. Please understand I’m writing from a place of childhood scars, and perhaps in explaining them, it can provide us all with more tools at our disposal for creating positive relationships. I guess that’s another hope I have from this.

A Quiet Passion Burns Brightly

Last night, on a whim I went to see Terence Davie's indie film A Quiet Passion, about the life of Emily Dickinson at my local Sundance theater, and was completely blown away. I'd read a couple of reviews online, so I knew to expect witter banter, lyrical recitations of Dickinson's poetry, and a look at Dickinson's relationship with her family and religion. What I did not expect was how much I would feel watching it. I laughed my way through the first half and cried my way through the second. I haven't experienced that kind of catharsis in a long time. First of all, the film is hilarious. It capture the clever, irreverent charm of Emily Dickinson and her siblings in a way I've never seen translated to screen. The dialogue is masterfully written and superbly acted. Most of us familiar with Emily know her through her poetry, which has led to a perception of her as morose and somber. Her reputation as a recluse who never left her house in later years rounds out the picture of a sad, isolated woman who probably felt little joy and was likely decidedly dull. Yet, her letters reveal her as a highly intelligent and witty woman with a remarkable sense of humor and light about her that, once recognized, shines through in her poetry as well. [caption id="attachment_273" align="aligncenter" width="630"] I want to be bffs with these ladies and snark with them all day. Pictured (left to right): Vryling Buffam, Emily Dickinson, and Vinnie Dickinson.[/caption]

Get Ready for #EarpWatch on Twitter!

Season 2 of Wynonna Earp is here! That’s right, my lovelies. I’m going to be doing a live #EarpWatch this season on Twitter via The Fandomentals Twitter feed. So if…

Crosspost: Thank God I Found TGIFemslash

I decided to ramble about my amazing, inspiring, affirming weekend at TGIFemslash. “Fandom has, in many ways, existed in my life since I was a child. Yet I’m still a…

Let’s Talk About Supergirl’s Lyra Strayd

With all that’s been happening on Supergirl recently, small scenarios and interactions can quickly get lost in the shuffle. The dominance of one particular character especially has taken focus away from minor characters. One such character I think has gotten overlooked is Winn’s new girlfriend, Lyra Strayd. And that’s who I want to talk about, because I (and one of my friends) get some fascinating subtext from her character that no one else is talking about.

Who is Lyra Strayd?

What do we know about her? Lyra (played by Tamzin Merchant) is an alien from Starhaven, a planet with connections to the Anasazi culture in the post-Crisis comics. They also have wings and can survive in space without oxygen in the comics (due to genetic engineering), though none of these aspects seem to have made it into the Supergirl adaptation. Not that this lack of tie in to the comics is entirely new for the show, given that Alex doesn’t exist in the comics nor are Kara’s parents scientists and engineers. Just because something doesn’t make it from comic to screen doesn’t mean it’s an intentional slight. Supergirl the show ≠ the comics in more ways than it actually resembles them. Anyway, Lyra as we see her on screen has escaped a planetary crises on Starhaven and found a home as a refugee on Earth. She’s skilled in hand-to-hand combat, forthright in her sexual and romantic preferences, not at all ashamed to take the lead in a relationship, and also a huge nerd. [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="418"] I love these two as a couple just for this joke. But also, they're adorable.[/caption] All that’s pretty clear just from her on screen presence.